broadwayphotos:

Norm Lewis and Jeremy Jordan in NY City Center’s A Bed and A Chair (2013).

broadwayphotos:

Norm Lewis and Jeremy Jordan in NY City Center’s A Bed and A Chair (2013).

reblogged 22 hours ago @ 23 Apr 2014 with 159 notes via/source
emodetron:

Jeremy Jordan seriously being the world’s biggest, most precious life ruiner. 

emodetron:

Jeremy Jordan seriously being the world’s biggest, most precious life ruiner. 

reblogged 22 hours ago @ 23 Apr 2014 with 200 notes via/source
reblogged 1 day ago @ 23 Apr 2014 with 1,589 notes via/source

A toast, to the proud Lannister children.

reblogged 1 day ago @ 22 Apr 2014 with 9,772 notes via/source
reblogged 1 day ago @ 22 Apr 2014 with 143,657 notes via/source
cinderella1181:

theduplicitytimes:

6 WRITING TIPS FROM JOHN STEINBECK
Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.
"If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story."


losille2000, I feel like we both forget this sometimes…

cinderella1181:

theduplicitytimes:

6 WRITING TIPS FROM JOHN STEINBECK

  1. Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
  2. Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
  3. Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
  4. If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
  5. Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
  6. If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.

"If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story."

losille2000, I feel like we both forget this sometimes…
reblogged 1 day ago @ 22 Apr 2014 with 9,343 notes via/source

btmegan:

i hope one day parents don’t assume their kids are straight 

reblogged 2 days ago @ 22 Apr 2014 with 1,955 notes via/source
reblogged 2 days ago @ 22 Apr 2014 with 7 notes via/source

ilikebroadwaythings:

ONE WEEK UNTIL TONY NOMINATIONS BYE

reblogged 2 days ago @ 22 Apr 2014 with 549 notes via/source
reblogged 2 days ago @ 22 Apr 2014 with 681 notes via/source

ryan steele + how do you do that shit

reblogged 2 days ago @ 22 Apr 2014 with 4,196 notes via/source
reblogged 2 days ago @ 21 Apr 2014 with 4,563 notes via/source
nobodytoldthehorse:

gooodnightraggedyman:

THIS IS MY FAVORITE PICTURE EVER

I am 100% convinced Andy Richardson is a modern-day demigod

nobodytoldthehorse:

gooodnightraggedyman:

THIS IS MY FAVORITE PICTURE EVER

I am 100% convinced Andy Richardson is a modern-day demigod

reblogged 2 days ago @ 21 Apr 2014 with 269 notes via/source

florialy:

I hate it when you finally accept one of your insecurities and then someone makes a harsh, unneeded comment about it and it puts you right back to square one.

reblogged 2 days ago @ 21 Apr 2014 with 82,492 notes via/source

eldermccutie:

[aggressively tries to sing every part in Man Up by myself]

reblogged 2 days ago @ 21 Apr 2014 with 130 notes via/source